Back down to earth

Click here for the story so far πŸ˜‰

1 allotment

2 allotment

3 allotment

4 allotment

5 allotment

6 allotment

7 allotment

8 allotment

If you fancy growing your own delicious organic fruits and vegetables but you don’t have a garden, why not apply for an allotment? Β Click here to find out how.

It’s true that there are sometimes long waiting lists but not always. We were very lucky that our village was just setting up new allotments and we were able to get one within a few months of moving there. And there are still a few plots available now.

So go on, find out what’s available in your area – the National Allotment Society will give you all the info you need – and do something that’ll get you out in the fresh air and sunshine for a good dose of vitamin D and some healthy exercise, while at the same time providing you with quality, organic vegetables that are good for you and the earth πŸ˜€

25 thoughts on “Back down to earth

  1. Thank you for liking “Red Geraniums.” I enjoyed this post. πŸ™‚ It reminds me of the time I was able to do gardening one summer in my backyard. I liked being able to eat fresh vegetables that I grew myself. I would like to have another vegetable garden again, but I don’t have the time to attend to it right now. In addition, there is a drought here in California, so outdoor watering is limited to twice a week.

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  2. Ha! Love this… Your allotment looks awesome, and you’ll have plenty of tasties to harvest later in the year. Can there be anything more satisfying than digging up potatoes? It’s like finding buried treasure! Enjoy πŸ™‚

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  3. We’ve just pulled the buckwheat up in preparation for planting broom corn! No quite no-till but we don’t want it to reseed. πŸ™‚ We also use clover–okay, the clover uses us, I think!–peas and tillage radish. Cover crops (green manure) are easy and fun and, yes, you’re so right, the bees love it!!! Thx for sharing!

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    • That’s really interesting, thanks for telling us. Yes, everyone told us to dig it in or at least cut it down before it flowered because if it goes to seed you’ll never get rid of it, but we just let it flower – it was so beautiful and the bees were all over it – and left it to die down into a mulch cover, and so far it hasn’t come back, save one or two easy to remove shoots πŸ™‚ Good luck with your broom corn. πŸ™‚

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